Equalities

Equalities Information 2017-18

Context

FSM:  The school is in the second quintile (top 20%) for FSM and has been well above the National figures for the past three years. 2017 30% vs 24% NA

Pupil Premium:  The average percentage of pupils eligible for pupil premium funding in primary schools for the 2015/16 academic year was 32%.  In our school, 23% are currently eligible for Free School Meals (FSM) with 26% of our pupils being EVER6 FSM (meaning they were eligible for FSM during the last 6 years).  In total, our disadvantaged pupils are broadly in line with the national average of 2015/16. 

EAL:  The school is in the first quintile (top 10%) for pupils with EAL, the proportions are well above the national figures and have been for a three-year period.

SEND:  The school is in the middle quintile for school support and has been broadly in line with the national average for the past three years. However, it is in the first quintile (top 10%) for pupils with an EHCP with over double the national figure, this has been the case for the past three years. 2017 3.2% vs 1.3% NA.

The school’s deprivation indicator is in the second quintile (top 20%) and is in line with the national

Ethnicity – the school has 14 of the 17 ethnic groups and in 2017 was made up of:

  • 60% white British
  • 6% any other white background
  • 8% Black or black British African
  • 26% Other

Pupil and Staff Profile

Age:  The school has a maximum of 45 pupils per year group.  This necessitates the formation of some mixed age classes throughout the school.  They are organised as follows:

Reception:  One single-age class of 22 pupils; one single-age class of 23 pupils

Key Stage 1 (Years 1 and 2):   One single age Year 1 class of 30 pupils; one mixed-age year 1/2 group of 30 pupils; one single-age year 2 group of 30 pupils.

Lower Key Stage 3 (Years 3 and 4):  One single age Year 3 class of 30 pupils; one mixed-age year 3/4 group of 30 pupils; one single-age year 4 group of 28 pupils.

Upper Key Stage 2 (Years 5 and 6):  One single age Year 5 class of 30 pupils; one mixed-age year 5/6 group of 30 pupils; one single-age year 6 group of 30 pupils.

The staff profile is not representative of any age group more than another.  There is a spread of ages from those beginning their professional lives to those approaching retirement.

Gender:  We are a   co-educational school.  There are currently 144 boys and 157 girls on our roll.  The balance in each year group is as follows:

Ethnicity:  We serve a multi-ethnic community.  Currently, 41% of our pupils are of Minority Ethnic Origin (MEO).  23% of our pupils have English as an Additional Language (EAL).

Our pupils are of 15 different ethnicities – the largest group (59%) is White British; our pupils speak  21 different home languages – the largest home language group is English – approximately 60%, with the next largest groups being Somali, Portuguese, Turkish, Polish, then Bengali.  Our staff profile is predominantly White British.  We have three MEO teachers and three BME lunchbreak supervisors.  The governing body is also predominantly White British.

Faith:  The school serves a multi-faith community.  Our pupils are of 8 different faiths – the largest faith groups being Christian and Muslim.   The pupil’s uniform policy refers to cultural sensitivities, in respect of headscarves.  We do not record staff data relating to faith.

Disability:  One of our current ‘pupils on roll’ has a physical disability and one has a visual impairment.  There are no other pupils with a physical disability, hearing or visual impairment.  An accessible disabled toilet is available and used by pupils with short-term medical needs, e.g. Using crutches.

There are a very small number of pupils (less than 10), whose long-term health issues have an impact on attendance.  This number is not published, to avoid identification of children.  There are no disabled members of staff.  There are no accessibility issues which affect staff and pupils in the school, as this was carefully planned when the new school building and outdoor environment was designed and built in 2011.  The percentage of pupils supported at ‘SEN Support’ level or with an Educational Health Care Plan (EHCP), is well above the  national average.

Children Looked After:  There are currently 2 ‘Looked After children’ and 5 children ‘Adopted from Care’ and 1 adopted from within their family, on roll.

Sexual Orientation:  No data about the sexual orientation of staff is collected or held by the school.

Gender Reassignment:  No data about staff in relation to gender reassignment is collected or held by the school.

Performance Trends, Behaviour and Attendance

EYFS

Outcomes have improved from the 2016 dip from significantly below to in line with national figures in 2017. Data and targets predict that the 2018 cohort are on track to again be in line or above national figures. This is good progress given the large group of pupils who enter school below typical and/or with low levels of spoken English.

Year 1 phonics

  • Gender – in 2017 there was a significant gender gap in phonics 64% B vs 86% G. There was no gender gap in 2016.
  • There is a two-year trend of only half of the disadvantaged pupils achieving the desired outcomes.
  • Outcomes for EAL pupils significantly improved from 2016 with 78% achieving the pass mark to 91% achieving the pass mark in 2017

Phonics is a priority for 2017/18 especially for Boys and disadvantaged

Year 2 Outcomes

Reading

  • Reading outcomes for 2017 at EXS were broadly in line with the NA. However, 79% of this cohort achieved GLD. Outcomes at greater depth were significantly below national.
  • Gender –10% gap between boys and girls with girls achieving 80% (national gap 9%). There was no gender gap in 2016 however, both groups were below the national.
  • Disadvantaged – 50% (3 out of 6) pupils achieved EXS. In 2016 71% (10 out of 14) achieved EXS above the all However this is due to small numbers and their impact on percentages.
  • EAL – 57% (4 out of 7) achieved EXS in 2017 compared to 85% (11 out of 13) in 2017

Boys reading, disadvantaged and Greater Depth are a priority for 2017/18

Writing

  • A significant increase in EXS to now above the national figures. Pupils attaining GDS is a two-year trend of well below the national figures.
  • Gender – 2016 a gap of 5% in favour of the boys was present in 2017 the outcomes were in line between the genders.
  • Disadvantaged – 50% (3 out of 6) pupils achieved EXS. In 2016 64% (9 out of 14) achieved EXS above the All. Although disadvantaged pupils achieved less well in 2017 this is not a trend of underachievement in KS1.
  • EAL – 57% (4 out of 7) achieved EXS in 2017 compared to 77% (10 out of 13) in 2017

Writing at Greater Depth is a priority for 2017/18

Maths

  • A significant increase in EXS to now in line with the national figures. Pupils attaining GDS is a two-year trend of well-below the national figures. With no girls attaining GDS in 2016 and 2 girls in 2017.
  • Gender – There was no gender gap at EXS in 2016, however, both were below the national figures. In 2017 an 8% gap in favour of the boys was present.
  • Disadvantaged – 67% (4 out of 6) pupils achieved EXS. In 2016 71% (10 out of 14) achieved EXS above the All. This is not a trend of underachievement in KS1.
  • EAL – 57% (4 out of 7) achieved EXS in 2017 compared to 77% (10 out of 13) in 2017.

Greater Depth and girls’ Greater Depth are a priority for 2017/18

Year 6 KS2 Outcomes

Reading

  • Gender – the significant gap of 25% in favour of the boys was closed in 2017 to 9% in favour of the girls. However, boys still made stronger progress than the girls in 2017. Although a significant improvement in the number of girls attaining GDS in 2017 still fewer girls achieve the higher level than boys (8% gap)
  • Disadvantaged – 2016 – 33% (8 out of 24) achieved EXS a 39% difference from all non-disadvantaged pupils nationally. With 0% GDS with a progress score of -3.36. A significant improvement in 2017 to 70% (16 out of 23) a gap of only 7% from the group non-disadvantaged and above the national All figure. Progress for disadvantaged pupils in 2017 was in line with all at +0.36.
  • EAL – 2016 – 62% achieved EXS with a progress score of -0.61 below that of non-EAL. In 2017 82% achieved EXS.
  • LAC – in 2017 the one looked after pupil achieved EXS.

High prior attainers and greater depth are a priority in 2017/18

Writing

  • Overall attainment has increased from significantly below the national and floor standard to within 8% the national in 2017 at EXS: a significant improvement. A 15% gain has also been made in GDS to just below the national in 2017.
  • Progress improved in 2017 from significantly below in 2017 and the bottom 10% of schools to in line with broadly average. Although strong gains were made in attainment, progress remains in the fourth quintile. A two-year trend of low progress.
  • Gender – a 10% gender gap in favour of the girls was present in 2017 with both groups performing below others nationally. 
  • Disadvantaged – 2016 – 13% (3 out of 24) achieved EXS a 66% difference from all non-disadvantaged pupils nationally. With 0% GDS. A significant improvement in 2017 to 70% (16 out of 23) to a gap of 11% from the group non-disadvantaged. Progress for disadvantaged pupils in 2017 was above All.
  • EAL – 2016 – 23% achieved EXS with a progress score below that of non-EAL. In 2017 73% achieved EXS with a progress score of +0.13
  • LAC – in 2017 the one looked after pupil achieved EXS and a progress score of +3.70.

Middle prior attainers, progress in writing and boys writing are a priority for 2017/18

Mathematics

  • Gender – the significant gap of 39% in favour of the boys was closed in 2017 to10% in favour of the girls. However, boys still made stronger progress than the girls in 2017 with girls progress lower than the floor standard. The number of girls attaining GDS remains static at 5%, 21% lower than boys and well below the national.
  • Disadvantaged – 2016 – 25% (6 out of 24) achieved EXS a 51% difference from all non-disadvantaged pupils nationally. With 4% GDS with a progress score of -5.34. A significant improvement in 2017 to 70% (16 out of 23) a gap of 10% from the group non-disadvantaged. Progress for disadvantaged pupils in 2017 was stronger than the group All at -2.65.
  • EAL – 2016 – 82% achieved EXS with a progress score of -0.06. In 2017 62% achieved EXS with a progress score of -1.53 a drop on 2016.
  • LAC – in 2017 the one looked after pupil did not achieve EXS and a progress score of -2.49.
  • PAG – High prior attainers made the lowest progress at -4.0 in the bottom 10% of schools.

High prior attainers and girls are a priority in 2017/18

Behaviour

There has been a huge improvement in behaviour since implementing and consistently upholding our most recent Behaviour and Discipline policy.  We work very hard to identify SEBD (Social Emotional Behavioural Difficulties) in children and plan for early intervention.  From our behaviour monitoring, we can see that there are more concerns presented by children suffering from traumatic stress symptoms who generally have difficulty regulating their behaviours and emotions.  The majority of fixed period exclusions over previous years have been for White British boys/girls who have suffered some kind of childhood trauma.  One pupil has been given fixed period exclusions in the current academic year; this child is White British Disadvantaged.

Attendance

It is a known fact that children from disadvantaged backgrounds are much more likely to be persistently absent than their peers. Children who are eligible for free school meals (FSM) are over three times more likely to be persistently absent than their non-FSM peers.

This difference in attendance is mirrored in the attainment gap between children from poorer backgrounds and those from more affluent backgrounds. At Staple Hill Primary School, our attendance monitoring is extensive.  In the academic year 2016-17, there were more Disadvantaged (42%) and SEND (53%) children whose attendance was a cause for concern than for any other group.  Many of these Disadvantaged families are affected by a range of deprivation indicators.  Amongst those whose attendance is low, there is no evidence of any gender or ethnic group being over-represented.

What we are doing to improve attendance this year?

  • Family Link Workers – supporting families through parenting advice; signposting parenting classes; completing forms for housing; food bank vouchers; identifying barriers and working with parents to improve attendance.
  • Behaviour Support Teacher – supporting parents through telephone conversations; one on one meetings to identify barriers and share strategies; one on one meetings with children to develop strategies for coping in school and improving attitude to school.
  • School Attendance Meetings – The Education Welfare Officer (EWO), Headteacher and Attendance Officer monitor attendance closely and will follow up reviews with formal and informal meetings with parents/carers and children.
  • Only absences for exceptional circumstances are approved and only after considering historical and current attendance for each child.
  • The Senior Leadership Team and teachers are raising the profile of punctuality and attendance. Pupil Premium funding is being used to address barriers and target poor attendance among our most disadvantaged children.

For the reporting period: Sept 2017 – 10th October 2017, the ‘children with SEND’ group represented 20% persistent absence (of 7 children) and 23% for ‘disadvantaged’ (of 8 children).  The school is tracking attendance to keep increasing the figures on 2016-17.  In the Autumn 2017 term, boys’ absence is a focus for us (11 children).

Bullying and Discrimination

We have very few instances of bullying.  We are proactive in combating bullying and spreading anti-bullying initiatives across the school.  These range from whole-school to class assemblies and PSHE class sessions.   We have a rigorous anti-bullying procedure.  All cases which come to our attention are dealt with promptly.  There is no one group of pupils who are victims or perpetrators of bullying.

In the last two years, there are no recorded instances of homophobic or of racist bullying.  There have been minor instances where racist language has been used and reported in keeping with school policy and procedures.   Any incidents that arise are used to inform our PSHE teaching in order to promote a clear stance against bullying and discrimination.

Our Equalities Objectives

We publish Equalities Objectives every year as part of our School Development Plan.  The objectives with a particular ‘Equalities’ focus link to the following SDP strands:

1.2 Focus on high prior attainers at KS2 in all areas, with an extra focus on high prior attaining girls in Mathematics, to increase attainment at the higher level and a greater number of pupils make at least expected progress.

1.4 Increase the number of pupils, especially boys, reaching the expected standard at the end of Year 1 in phonics and ensure all those who fail to meet the standard continue to catch up in Year 2.

1.5 Improve the outcomes in Mathematics across the school with a focus on challenge for the most able, girls and embedding ‘Big Maths’.

1.6 Raise outcomes in Reading at KS1 so that they are in line with the outcomes in Writing and Mathematics, NA and reduce the gender gap.

2.4 Develop robust systems and tracking around interventions to accelerate learning, demonstrate impact and close gaps.

3.1 Develop the roles of SENCo and parent support worker to better remove barriers to learning

3.5 Focus, improve and formalise support for those children with additional EBD including the use of SAF and provision maps